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Sunday, 18 January 2004 05:42

CCPA: This analysis of O­ntario's current fiscal situation together with forecasts for economic growth and expenditure growth over the next four years finds that the McGuinty Government cannot keep its signature campaign commitments for public services renewal without both increasing taxes and running deficits for at least part of its first term in office. In order to balance the budget in fiscal year 2004-5, even with full-year revenue from all of its promised tax cut roll-backs, the Government would have to cut at least $2 billion from program spending. Using current average projections for economic growth and allowing for the impact of inflation and population growth o­n spending, the government will be able to implement o­nly about 40% of the public services renewal spending promised in the campaign by 2006-7.

Date: Fri, 16 Jan 2004 15:44:47 -0500From: CCPA < This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >Subject: New from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

January 16, 2004

Ontario Chose Change: Will the Liberals?Ontario Alternative Budget 2004 Technical Paper #1

by Hugh Mackenzie

Released January 12, 2004

This analysis of O­ntario's current fiscal situation together with forecasts for economic growth and expenditure growth over the next four years finds that the McGuinty Government cannot keep its signature campaign commitments for public services renewal without both increasing taxes and running deficits for at least part of its first term in office. In order to balance the budget in fiscal year 2004-5, even with full-year revenue from all of its promised tax cut roll-backs, the Government would have to cut at least $2 billion from program spending. Using current average projections for economic growth and allowing for the impact of inflation and population growth o­n spending, the government will be able to implement o­nly about 40% of the public services renewal spending promised in the campaign by 2006-7.

Ontario Chose Change: Will the Liberals? is available o­n the CCPA web site: http://www.policyalternatives.ca

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Straight Talk: Big Business and the Canada-US Free Trade Agreement Fifteen Years Later

by Bruce Campbell and David Macdonald

Released December 22, 2003

This study looked at BCNI's free trade jobs claim in relation to the employment record of 39 of its own member companies during the last 15 years. It found that overall, the 39 companies increased their combined revenues by $144 billion, a 105% jump during 1988-2002 These same 39 companies decreased their collective workforce by 100,268, or 14.5% during the same period.

The study also examined the claim that social programs would not be threatened, but rather would be strengthened under "free trade." It found evidence of massive cuts in public transfers to persons, from 13.5% of GDP to 10.5% of GDP during 1992-2002. This is the equivalent of $55 billion in the latter year. It also found strong evidence that the Canadian social state is converging downward to the level of the American social state. Although non-military spending in Canada was 5.7 percentage points of GDP greater than the US in 2001, that number is substantially down from 15.2 percentage points of GDP gap in 1992.

Straight Talk: Big Business and the Canada-US Free Trade Agreement Fifteen Years Later is available o­n the CCPA web site: http://www.policyalternatives.ca

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Paul Martin's Economic Record: Living Standards of Working Families and Prospects for Future ProsperityAlternative Federal Budget 2004 Technical Paper #2

by Andrew Jackson

Released December 10, 2003

While Paul Martin points to a strong record of economic growth and rising employment during his tenure as Finance Minister, his overall economic record is flawed when viewed from the perspective of working families. This study notes that despite the impressive growth of real GDP per person between 1993 and 2003, working families mainly increased their incomes by working longer hours. These gains in labour income from higher employment were offset by lower income transfers to households from all levels of government. Additionally, corporate pre-tax profits have grown as a share of national income at the expense of wages and salaries. Income inequality and poverty have both increased when account is taken of the state of the business cycle and re-distributive economic transfers, economic security, and access to public and social services were all undermined by Mr. Martin's spending cuts--particularly cuts to EI and transfers to the provinces.

Paul Martin's Economic Record: Living Standards of Working Families and Prospects for Future Prosperity is available o­n the CCPA web site: http://www.policyalternatives.ca

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From Leaps of Faith to Hard Landings: Fifteen Years of "Free Trade"

by Andrew Jackson

This study evaluates the impacts of the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in the context of the great "free trade debate" of the late 1980s and finds that free trade's promises of a significant boost to productivity growth and positive restructuring of Canadian industry have been largely unrealized. The report examines the impacts of closer economic integration o­n wages, income distribution, and social programs, and argues that fears of "downward harmonization" were amply justified.

From Leaps of Faith to Hard Landings: Fifteen Years of "Free Trade" is available o­n the CCPA web site: http://www.policyalternatives.ca

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Paul Martin, the Deficit, and the Debt: Taking Another LookAlternative Federal Budget 2004 Technical Paper #1

by Jim Stanford

Released November 28, 2003

This study asserts that Paul Martin's sterling reputation as the deficit hero may not be entirely justified. Eighteen OECD countries balanced their budgets during the late 1990s almost as quickly as Canada, but with a fraction of the damage to public programs and infrastructure. Federal program spending declined far faster and far deeper during the Martin era than in any other major industrial economy - even those starting out with larger deficits and debts. The study singles out federal budget-making practices under Mr. Martin for particular criticism. Since 1994, federal finances have missed their official budget targets by an average of $9 billion per year; these consistent errors reflect deliberate efforts by Finance Canada to understate the true strength of federal finances.

Paul Martin, the Deficit, and the Debt: Taking Another Look is available o­n the CCPA web site: http://www.policyalternatives.ca

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Lessons from NAFTA: The High Cost of "Free Trade"

by the Hemispheric Social Alliance

Released November 18, 2003

The study, published by the CCPA and prepared by researchers in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, finds the effects of NAFTA to have been overwhelmingly negative for the workers and consumers in all three countries. In all three countries, NAFTA has depressed wages, worsened poverty and inequality, destroyed more jobs than it has created, eroded social programs, undermined democracy, and enfeebled governments while greatly increasing the rights, power and wealth of corporations and big investors.

Copies of Lessons from NAFTA: The High Cost of "Free Trade" can be purchased from the CCPA for $14.95 each (plus shipping & handling). To order your copy o­nline, visit the CCPA web site at http://www.policyalternatives.ca

 

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Last Updated on Sunday, 18 January 2004 05:42
 

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