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Iraq : the Deceptions Continue PDF Print E-mail
Peace News
Friday, 09 December 2005 11:08
IRAQ: THE DECEPTIONS CONTINUE
F.H. Knelman, Ph.D.

It is not just a short memory but, even now, a deliberate accommodation of the government that has guided CNN?s response to the current issue of the war in Iraq. It permits Bush and Cheney to make public speeches on the need to win the ?war on terror?, Iraq being the centre of that war when the current terror was created by the U.S. invasion, an invasion based on numerous lies. The tactic is transparent. Invade a country based on lies and then use these lies to justify the invasion under the phoney umbrella of the so-called war on terror.

www.pej.org
IRAQ: THE DECEPTIONS CONTINUE
F.H. Knelman, Ph.D.

It is not just a short memory but, even now, a deliberate accommodation of the government that has guided CNN?s response to the current issue of the war in Iraq. It permits Bush and Cheney to make public speeches on the need 
to win the ?war on terror?, Iraq being the centre of that war when the current terror was created by the U.S. invasion, an invasion based on numerous lies. The tactic is transparent. Invade a country based on lies and then use these lies to justify the invasion under the phoney umbrella of the so-called war on terror.

The trial of Saddam Hussein is a mockery of justice. This is not to deny that he had his own reign of terror. But compared to the crime the U.S. has committed in Iraq, where up to 100,000 Iraqis have been killed, compared to the 140 Saddam executed, proves who is really guilty of mass terror.

Moreover, the entire event was in a sovereign state. Its invasion by the U.S. has violated international law, the Geneva Convention, the Rome Statute and the U.N. Charter. And it is pitiful when Condoleezza Rice on one day denies the U.S. is involved in any torture of prisoners and the next day agrees on the rendition policy of the U.S. but states the U.S. gets
?assurances? there will be no torture. Both parties share the lie.

International assessments have documented the use of torture on a broad scale.

The dynamics of the Iraqi situation are that the presence of the Americans fuels the conflict, builds the insurgency and undermines any hope of real security. This is not to say that there are internal sources of conflict between the Shiites, Sunnis and Kurds. Nor is it to deny that some of the insurgents are ruthless criminals who kill innocent people. The recent case  of the four captured peace workers is a classic example. Nevertheless it is the U.S. presence that has unleashed the terror and provided their rationale for fighting it when the real reasons are political and geopolitical. The

U.S. announcement that it might withdraw some 30,000 U.S. troops in the next six months is a transparent ploy, played out in the context of the 2006 mid-term elections. And beyond this, the above withdrawal has to be rationalized on the alleged increased capacity of Iraqi troops. No matter what outcome one chooses, as long as opposing fundamentalist groups confront each other stability is impossible. It took a dictator, Saddam Hussein, to overcome this. It would take an independent army to achieve it. What we are arguing is that the intrinsic conflicts in Iraq make the above scenario a
necessary fact. It is a classic case of holding a tiger by the tail.

A true trial for the group murder of innocents would put the U.S. on the stand in the name of its president, George W. Bush, a true mass murderer. It is probably a vain hope, but perhaps some day Bush will be impeached for his crimes, together with the other two of the unholy trio, i.e. Cheney and Rumsfeld. These three are the worst international criminals in the world.

The reality is that the murderous history of the U.S., independent of which president was in power, is one long series of international crimes, mainly in Central and South America, where they intervened on the side of tyrants in acts of bloody terror. Harold Pinter, the current winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, put it succinctly in his acceptance speech: ?We have brought torture, cluster bombs, depleted uranium, innumerable acts of random murder, misery, degradation and death to the Iraqi people and call it ?bringing freedom and democracy to the Middle East?.?
Last Updated on Friday, 09 December 2005 11:08
 

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