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Consent Means Consent Not Consultation, Coercion or “after the Decision", Notification E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 13 June 2019 07:22

1.The Lubicon Cree: Ongoing human rights violations

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The Lubicon Cree: Ongoing human rights violations

 

The Lubicon Cree: A case study in ongoing human rights violations exerpts from article by  Amnesty International

he Lubicon Cree: A case study in ongoing human rights violations. ... 

Territory that the Lubicon have relied on to hunt, fish and trap is now crisscrossed by more than 2400 km of oil and gas pipelines.

That's more than five wells for every Lubicon person.“..

.the basic health and resistance to infection of community members has deteriorated dramatically.

The lack of running water and sanitary facilities in the community, needed to replace

the traditional systems of water and sanitary management...is leading to the development of diseases associated

with poverty and poor sanitary and healthconditions.” Lubicon complaint upheld by the United Nations Human Rights Committee in 1990

 

 

Last Updated on Sunday, 16 June 2019 08:06
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We Must do More to Speed up Ending Fossil Fuel Subsidies E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 05 June 2019 11:43

By Niklas Hagelberg iklas Hagelberg is Coordinator, Climate Change Programme, UN Environment

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NAIROBI, Kenya, Jun 5 2019 (IPS) - Fossil fuels—oil, gas, coal and their derivatives—pollute the atmosphere and emit the greenhouse gases that are ramping up global heating to dangerous levels. But did you know that governments around the world are subsidizing this pollution?

Historically, governments around the world have used fossil fuel subsidies for a variety of reasons, including to promote energy independence, encourage industry and cushion the poorest in society.

But they never took sufficient account of what economists call “externalities” such as air pollution and the resulting impacts on our health.

There is a special kind of madness in a system that funds the healthcare burden from asthma, respiratory diseases and lung cancer, and at the same time funds companies that pollute the air and contribute towards these health issues in the first place.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 12 June 2019 09:10
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Elementary students restore, reclaim neighbourhood park E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 30 May 2019 18:50

Students from Janet Langston’s Grade 3 and 4 class at Margaret Jenkins elementary celebrate the school’s efforts to remove invasive species from Trafalgar Park (below King George Terrace). The park was covered in gorse and blackberry and wild flowers and roses are now thriving. (Travis Paterson/News Staff)

Margaret Jenkins students 2.5 years into restoration

 

The reclamation of Trafalgar Park continues but to anyone who has visited in the past three years, the removal of invasive species has revealed a landscape unseen for decades.

And the work has been done by a pair of Margarets.

Well known Uplands Park advocate and volunteer Margaret Lidkea helped lead a program for nearby Margaret Jenkins elementary school students. Lidkea provides the know-how and the students provide the muscle.

Last Updated on Sunday, 02 June 2019 14:50
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WITH INDUSTRY DATING BACK TO 1859, PENNSYLVANIA STRUGGLES WITH 200,000+ ORPHAN WELLS E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 27 May 2019 10:58
 
FULL STORY: E&E NEWS @EENEWSUPDATES
 
MAY 26, 2019PRIMARY AUTHOR MIKE LEE @MIKELEEFW0
Jeremy Buckingham/flickr
https://theenergymix.com/2019/05/26/with-industry-dating-back-to-1859-pennsylvania-struggles-with-200000-orphan-wells/
 
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Although pressure is building on the fossil industry to address fugitive emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells, deadbeat drillers and insufficient public funds for cleanup mean Pennsylvania landowners who once played host to oil and gas extraction remain captive to all that was left behind.
 
While orphan wells have emerged as a tough, legally contentious issue in Alberta and British Columbia, they’re a much more established problem in Pennsylvania, where the United States’ first well was drilled in 1859, E&E News reports. Today, the state is “home to between 200,000 and 750,000 so-called orphan wells that have been abandoned and that have no apparent owner.” Taken together, these wells “emit 40,000 to 70,000 tonnes of methane a year, between 5% and 8% of the state’s human-caused methane emissions.”
 
Like this story? Subscribe to The Energy Mix and never miss an edition of our free e-digest.
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Do We Need a Global Convention of Common Principles for Building Peace? E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Friday, 17 May 2019 12:45

By Thalif Deen - Reprint

Sweden’s Minister for International Development Cooperation Peter Eriksson

STOCKHOLM, May 17 2019 (IPS)  - When the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) concluded a three-day forum on “Peace and Development” on May 16, the primary focus was the daunting challenges threatening global security, including growing military interventions, spreading humanitarian emergencies, forced migration, increasing civil wars, extreme weather conditions triggered by climate change and widespread poverty and conflict-related hunger.

For many decades, said the Swedish Minister for International Development Cooperation Peter Eriksson, the rules of war were designed by the Geneva Conventions.

“Do we need to develop and adopt common principles for building peace?,” he asked, before a gathering of more than 400 high-level policymakers, researchers and practitioners in the Swedish capital during the opening session of the sixth annual Stockholm Forum on Peace and Development

Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 May 2019 10:06
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Monsanto’s “Rain of Death” on Canada’s Forests E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 16 May 2019 13:42
 
By Joyce Nelson
 
 
egion: Canada
 
Theme: Biotechnology and GMO, Law and Justice
 
altFirst Nations in Ontario have run out of patience. For 43 years, the forest industry has been conducting aerial spraying of glyphosate herbicide on Indigenous lands – a “rain of death” used in forest management practice that has slowly been killing off a wide range of animals, plants, fish and insects. First Nations have tried to stop this practice since the 1990s through a variety of measures including meetings with logging companies and government officials, protests and reports, but all to no avail. The “rain of death” keeps coming.
 
 
Now, members of the Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) Elders of the North Shore of Lake Huron say they will be going to court to force the Canadian federal government to live up to Robinson Huron Treaty of 1850. That treaty guarantees First Nations in the area the right to hunt, fish, gather berries and use plant medicines in traditional territories. The TEK Elders say that by allowing the aerial spraying to continue, the Trudeau government is violating this treaty and the Constitution Act of 1982, which reaffirms those rights.
 
“We’re done waiting,” Raymond Owl, one of the founding members of TEK, told the press in April. [1] Formed in 2014, the TEK Elders group is comprised of Elders from 21 bands in the area.
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UN chief concerned nuclear 'coffin' leaking in Pacific E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Thursday, 16 May 2019 09:05

A huge concrete dome built over a crater left by one of the 43 nuclear blasts on Runit Island photographed in 1980

A huge concrete dome built over a crater left by one of the 43 nuclear blasts on Runit Island photographed in 1980 (AFP Photo/)

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres raised concerns Thursday that a concrete dome built last century to contain waste from atomic bomb tests is leaking radioactive material into the Pacific.

Speaking to students in Fiji, Guterres described the structure on Enewetak atoll in the Marshall Islands as "a kind of coffin" and said it was a legacy of Cold War-era nuclear tests in the Pacific

Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 May 2019 10:26
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Warnings of 'Gulf of Tonkin 2.0' as Trump Officials Blame Iran for Oil Tanker Attacks E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Wednesday, 15 May 2019 07:18

Originally Published on Tuesday, May 14, 2019 by Common Dreams

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The Al Marzoqah oil tanker on Monday, a day after it was attacked outside the Fujairah port in the United Arab Emirates. (Photo: EPA-EFE)

Is the Trump administration attempting to concoct a false pretext to justify launching a war against Iran?

Gareth Porter without citing any concrete evidence blamed Iran for reported attacks on Saudi and UAE oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz over the weekend.

Commentators quickly likened the accusations to the Gulf of Tonkin incident, referring to the "fabricated" event that President Lyndon Johnson used to massively escalate America's war in Vietnam.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 May 2019 10:40
 
Internal Displacement “Deserves Visibility” E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 13 May 2019 12:45

Gul Jan, 90, and her family fled their village in Ab Kamari district and went to Qala-e-Naw in search of drinking water and food during the 2018 drought in Afghanistan. When this photo was taken in 2018, she, her son Ahmad and her four grandchildren had been living in a makeshift home in the Farestan settlement for internally displaced people for at least four months. Courtesy: NRC/Enayatullah Azad

UNITED NATIONS, May 11 2019 (IPS) - More people are displaced inside their own countries than ever before, and only higher figures can be expected without urgent long-term action, a new report found.

Launched by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Center (IDMC) of the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), the new Global Report on Internal Displacement examines trends in internal displacement worldwide and has found a dismal picture.

Related IPS Articles

“This year’s report is a sad reminder of the recurrence of displacement, and of the severity and urgency of IDPs’ needs. Many of the same factors that drove people from their homes now prevent them from returning or finding solutions in the places they have settled,” said IDMC’s Director Alexandra Bilak.

“The findings of this report are a wake-up call to world leaders. Millions of people forced to flee their homes last year are being failed by ineffective national governance and insufficient international diplomacy. Because they haven’t crossed a border, they receive pitiful global attention,” echoed NRC’s Secretary-General Jan Egeland.

According to the report, over 41 million people were estimated to be living in internal displacement as of the end of 2018, 28 million of which were new displacements.

A majority were due to natural disasters and just three countries accounted for 60 percent of all new disaster-related displacements.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 21 May 2019 11:06
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Open Letter to Jason Kenny E-mail
Posted by Dragon Slayer   
Monday, 13 May 2019 10:45

DearJason Kenny,

 

Thank you so much for accepting responsibility for turning off the taps to BC.

Your friendly "overworked and underepresented" environmentalist.

 

What the %^&*$#@ are you thinking shutting down Alberta's oil exports to BC?

Your not so friendly oil industry.

Your not so happy oil patch worker.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 18 June 2019 18:37
 
The US Is Spending $1.25 Trillion Annually E-mail
Posted by Joan Russow   
Monday, 13 May 2019 05:07
 
on War May 7, 2019
By William D. Hartung, Mandy Smithberger & Tom Dispatch
https://truthout.org/articles/the-us-is-spending-1-25-trillion-annually-on-war/
 

The military gravy train is running full speed ahead. - AIRMAN 1ST CLASS VALERIE SEELYE /
U.S. AIR FORCE May 7, 2019
In its latest budget request, the Trump administration is asking
 
U.S. AIR FORCE May 7, 2019
In its latest budget request, the Trump administration is asking for a near-record $750
billion for the Pentagon and related defense activities, an astonishing figure by any
measure. If passed by Congress, it will, in fact, be one of the largest military budgets in
American history,topping peak levels reached during the Korean and Vietnam Wars. And
keep one thing in mind: that $750 billion represents only part of the actual annual cost of
our national security state.
Last Updated on Monday, 13 May 2019 05:20
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